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Historicist: Eden Smith and the Arrival of the Arts and Crafts Movement in Toronto

A key figure within the Canadian Arts and Crafts movement, and well-connected to the cultural elite, Toronto architect Eden Smith made a lasting impact on the urban fabric of the city.

A sketch for the Wychwood branch of the Toronto Public Library, designed by Eden Smith. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

A sketch for the Wychwood branch of the Toronto Public Library, designed by Eden Smith. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

Born in Birmingham, England, at the epicentre of the Second Industrial Revolution in 1859, Eden Smith was brought up as the son of a successful craftsman. He showed a strong affinity early on for art, architecture, and design, and he attended the Birmingham School of Art. Smith’s middle-class education placed him in line with many of the prevailing ideas about art, socialism, and modernity that pervaded the time and place in which he grew up.

While he was in school, he admired the teachings of William Morris, the father of the British Arts and Crafts movement and himself a frequent speaker at the Birmingham School of Art during Smith’s tutelage. The young architect carried throughout his illustrious career in Canada a reverence for the idealism inherent to the movement’s founding principles. Bolstered thus by a deep respect for truth and authenticity through craft, Smith brought with him to his new home in Canada a desire to create a method and style of domestic architecture worthy of and inspired by the young nation which had beckoned he and countless others to start life anew.

Keep reading: Historicist: Eden Smith and the Arrival of the Arts and Crafts Movement in Toronto

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Stairway To Stardom: How #Stepgate Put Toronto on the Map

And why we should all be thanking Toronto's crusading columnist, who is still out there chasing the gravy train.

parks and wreck

She may write for a major Toronto newspaper, but no story is seemingly too inconsequential for the Sun‘s resident Right Wing Gay Jewish Muckraker, Sue-Ann Levy, who, not unlike Batman in the 2008 film The Dark Knight, can be thought of as Toronto’s watchful protector, always there when The Little Guy is getting pushed around by those Marxist bureaucrats and bean-counters. So when Levy’s Batphone rang last week with a tip that a 73-year-old Etobicoke man was the latest target of the Loony Left when all he was trying to do was help people out, she knew she had a big story, one that had the potential to expose the graft and wild expenditures oozing out of City Hall. Keep reading: Stairway To Stardom: How #Stepgate Put Toronto on the Map

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Albion Cinemas, Etobicoke’s Bollywood Shrine: An Appreciation

“India is known for its culture, and over here we do the same thing. No other cinema does that. People have to come here to watch those movies. And it’s like a community."

Albion 2

For the western filmgoer, visiting Albion Cinemas can feel like entering an alternate reality. Located at the Albion Centre mall in North Etobicoke, where first generation immigrants are over 50 per cent of the population, the Albion is one of three movie theatres in the GTA that exclusively show Indian cinema. The theatre is more than just a venue for Bollywood: it’s a shrine.
Keep reading: Albion Cinemas, Etobicoke’s Bollywood Shrine: An Appreciation