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culture

Rewriting Art History and the Bible on Stage with Botticelli in the Fire and Sunday in Sodom

Jordan Tannahill’s audacious pair of one-act plays bring Canadian Stage's season to a blazing conclusion.

Christopher Morris, left, as Lorenzo de' Medici and Salvatore Antonio as Sandro Botticelli in Jordan Tannahill's Botticelli in the Fire at Canadian Stage. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.

Christopher Morris, left, as Lorenzo de’ Medici and Salvatore Antonio as Sandro Botticelli in Jordan Tannahill’s Botticelli in the Fire at Canadian Stage. Photo by Cylla von Tiedemann.


Botticelli in the Fire and Sunday in Sodom
Berkeley Street Theatre (26 Berkeley Street)
Runs to May 15
Tickets: $24–$53
4 Stars


Brad Fraser was spotted last week at the opening night of Jordan Tannahill’s new plays, Botticelli in the Fire and Sunday in Sodom, at Canadian Stage. Seeing him couldn’t help but invite comparisons. After all, like Tannahill, Fraser was once the young gay playwright everyone was talking about, the outspoken rebel who wanted to shake up Canadian theatre. (See Tannahill’s 2015 book Theatre of the Unimpressed for details.)

Like Fraser’s, Tannahill’s work is witty, sexy, and audacious, with a strong emotional core. But, where Fraser’s early hits—Unidentified Human Remains, Poor Super Man—were dark, angry creations birthed during the AIDS era, Tannahill’s millennial pieces have more of a melancholic, whimsical tone. And where Fraser drew his inspiration from comic books and slasher flicks, Tannahill favours slightly older sources.

Botticelli in the Fire and Sunday in Sodom are a pair of one acts, the first a wild riff on the life of the great Italian Renaissance painter, the second a brilliant retelling of the biblical Sodom and Gomorrah story. Both plays are ultimately about huge sacrifices made for love.

Keep reading: Rewriting Art History and the Bible on Stage with Botticelli in the Fire and Sunday in Sodom

politics

Why Parents of Autistic Children Plan to Protest at Queen’s Park this Thursday

They're furious about Ontario's changes to services and funding for their kids.

Tara Ranger has a lot on her plate. Her son, who is six years old, has autism. His needs, however, are milder than other children, and as a result, he was discharged from a government-run therapy program, called intensive behavioural intervention, or IBI therapy. Service providers said he’d do better in a school setting.

Ranger then applied for government funding so she could receive access to the therapy through a private provider. But, thanks to new Ontario legislation, she will soon lose that funding—all because her son has reached the age threshold.

On May 5, busloads of parents just like Ranger, equipped with homemade banners, posters, and signs, will flood the front lawn of Queen’s Park. They are protesting the provincial government’s changes to autism services in Ontario, which will exclude children over the age of five from receiving much sought-after treatment.

The move, which the Liberals say will cut down wait times for the therapy, will oust more than 3,500 children from the wait list. There is currently a two- to four-year wait list for IBI therapy.

Here’s what you need to know about the legislative changes.

Keep reading: Why Parents of Autistic Children Plan to Protest at Queen’s Park this Thursday

news

How the Toronto Dailies Covered the Invictus Games Announcement

Oh, and the Raptors need some serious love.

In Front Page Challenge, Torontoist analyzes the best and worst of Toronto’s major dailies.

This morning’s Front Page Challenge is that rare thing: all five of Toronto’s daily papers feature the same photo op on the cover, a historic meeting between Canadian and British royalty heralding the launch of the countdown to a major sporting event taking place in the 6ix next year. But what about the big sporting event taking place tonight: the Raptors’ first conference semifinal appearance in 15 years? Which Toronto paper best commemorates this sporty moment best? The answer…may surprise you.

Keep reading: How the Toronto Dailies Covered the Invictus Games Announcement